Violent pornography and self-reported likelihood of sexual aggression (1988)

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Journal of Research in Personality

Volume 22, Issue 2, June 1988, Pages 140–153

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0092-6566(88)90011-6

Abstract

Two hundred twenty-two undergraduate males were administered an “attitudes survey” examining pornography use, attitudes, and self-reported likelihood of rape (LR) or using sexual force (LF). Nonviolent pornography was used by 81% of subjects within the last year, whereas 41 and 35% had used violent and sexually violent pornography, respectively. Twenty-seven percent of subjects indicated some hypothetical likelihood of raping or using sexual force against a woman. Discriminant function analysis revealed that use of sexually violent pornography and acceptance of interpersonal violence against women were uniquely associated with LF and LR. It is hypothesized that the specific fusion of sex and violence in some pornographic stimuli and in certain belief systems may produce a propensity to engage in sexually aggressive behavior. Results are interpreted in terms of Malamuth and Briere's (1986, Journal of Social Issues, 42, 75–92) model of the effects of sexually violent media.